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It's hardly uncommon for smartphone batteries to lose some of their oomph over time, but Apple just might be able to help if your iPhone 5's battery has been flakier than usual. The folks in Cupertino have figured out that some of the iPhone 5s sold between its launch in September 2012 and January 2013 have batteries that may "suddenly experience shorter battery life or need to be charged more frequently" and has kicked off a program to replace them free of charge. Mosey on over to Apple's support page to see if your iPhone 5 is one of the affected units -- if it is and you live in the United States or China, you can reach out and claim your replacement battery right now. What's that you say? You're one of those proactive types and already shelled out money for a replacement? Reach out anyway, because Apple may have a refund waiting for you. Alas, the rest of the world will have to wait just a little bit longer -- Apple plans to launch the program in other countries on August 29th.

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Leica M-P

Digital rangefinder cameras may look like retro fashion items, but they're genuinely handy for pros -- they're good for moments when you need quality without carrying a big, conspicuous DSLR. To that end, Leica has just launched the M-P, a new addition to the M series that's more about serious work than style. You're still getting a 24-megapixel full-frame sensor in a relatively small body, but the buffer memory has doubled to a hefty 2GB; the camera should almost always keep up with your rapid-fire photography. There's also a new selection lever that shows you framing for common focal lengths in the viewfinder, and an anti-reflective coating on the scratch-resistant sapphire LCD will help you review your snaps in bright sunlight.

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For Uber, its rise to the top hasn't always gone smoothly. From facing legal challenges across different parts of the world, to battling it out verbally with competitors, the ridesharing company has had to fight hard to make a name for itself. And now things have apparently taken a turn for the worse, at least for some of its drivers. According to PandoDaily, a number of Uber drivers in Los Angeles say they have been suffering from serious attacks, such as robberies at gunpoint, in recent months. The report, which cites three drivers who spoke on condition of anonymity, claims that people with bad intentions are using the Uber app to locate drivers on a map in order to rob them. While, in most cases, these criminals are looking to steal the Uber-provided phones carried by operators, PandoDaily was told someone was, at one point, the victim of a carjacking situation. Either way, the main concern here shouldn't be the iPhones or vehicles at stake, but rather every driver's safety. We've reached out to Uber for comment and will update this story if we hear back.

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Today, we anticipate the visual glory of Halo 2: Anniversary, learn that a monkey can't own photo rights, sit down without a chair, investigate problems with Secret's anonymity and more! Read on for Engadget's news highlights from the last 24 hours.

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While smartphone apps come in handy for a variety of uses from sharing photos to navigating a new locale, it appears that most folks in the US barely download them at all. According to ComScore, 65.5 percent of those users 18 and above who wield a handset in the US go a full month without visiting their respective app store for new material. This means that 34.5 percent load up at least one new selection every 30 days, and figures indicate that the top 7 percent of users are responsible for around half of a month's total. What's more, the iOS crowd primarily focuses on news, radio, photos, social networks and weather, while the Android faithful fire up Google Search and Gmail most often. And to the surprise of no one, Facebook is tops in terms of popularity and amount of time spent on its app. All of that said, most folks seem to load up their phones with the usual suspects early on, and don't tend to divide their attention too often thereafter.

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If you love hanging your dirty laundry on carefully curated and symbolic images, then Secret's next update both is -- and isn't -- for you. Sometime next week, the anonymous sharing app will integrate Flickr image search, but access to the photo service's library comes at a price: the ability to use your own photos. The update will remove the ability to upload images from your phone, with the exception of pictures taken in real-time with the Secret app itself.

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Remember that illusive "Buy Now" button that briefly showed up on Twitter last month? Re/Code says it's still on the way -- and it's backed by Stripe, a mobile payments startup. According to sources close to the outlet, merchants that want to sell products through tweets will need to sign up with Stripe's payment platform to get started, suggesting that the startup will be the only way to pay for goods on the social network. In the past, Twitter has been rumored to be working with Fancy.com to create a "Twitter Commerce" platform, although its unclear when the company's retail ambitions will come to fruition. Still, something is clearly in the works.

[Image credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images]

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Hackers Grab 40 Million Accounts From Target Stores

Target's massive data breach grabbed headlines right in the middle of holiday shopping that year, and the fallout continues. According to a Department of Homeland Security advisory this afternoon, the attacks that hit the red-hued retailer, along with Supervalu and UPS, are much more widespread than first reported. The so-called "Backoff" malware in various versions has actually hit more than 1,000 businesses in the States, allowing hackers to snag info from millions of credit card payments. Remote network access for contractors provides the avenue for entry, and the announcement suggests that companies have vendors take a close look at their systems for possible criminal activity. It's also calling for businesses to put cash registers on a separate network and employ two-factor authentication to help combat would-be intruders.

[Photo credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images]

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Unless you're deep in the throes of it yourself, actual, clinical depression can be incredibly hard to wrap your head around. Sure, you can scroll through the Wikipedia article all you like, but intellectually knowing about and feeling depression are two completely different beasts. Zoe Quinn's Depression Quest (which recently hit Steam after a year floating around on the web) is an experience that sort of straddles the line between the two, and -- in spite of a related mess that's still unfolding -- is still worth checking out.

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It's no secret that US and British spy agencies are trying to crack the Tor network, but new information suggests that the agencies' floundering efforts may be sabotaged from within. For the uninitiated, Tor is a web browser that anonymizes a person's identity, location and browsing activity using various technologies -- it's also a known gateway to the so-called "dark-web" that hosts sites like the Silk Road. Naturally, spy organizations see it as a threat, but the Tor Project's Andrew Lewman says some of the agencies' employees are undermining their own hacking efforts. "There are plenty of people in both organizations who can anonymously leak data to us and say, maybe you should look ere, maybe you should fix this," he told the BBC in a recent interview. "And they have."

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